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: the chicago board of education is expected to vote on the measure in may. declining enrollment has also forced other major cities like washington d.c. and philadelphia to close scores of public schools in recent years. we take up the debate now with two people at the center of the fight. we start with jesse ruiz. he's vice president of the chicago board of education. he was appointed to that post by mayor rahm emanuel in 2011. i spoke with him a short time ago. welcome to you, so why is such a dramatic action so necessary? is this resources, money, pure and simple? >> no. it is two-fold. one, we are looking at a record budget deficit of about $1 billion next year. so we're looking for every aspect to reap savings in our system. and we have underutilized schools as a result from it population loss in certain parts of the city of chicago. it's healthy for those schools to right size, to become fully utilizeed schools and combining under-utilizeed schools which garners savings we can reinvest and focus the resources we have in one school billion as opposed to multiple, partially used billions. >>
, service providers, educators and community members. we are committed to ending human trafficking through collaboration, education, outreach, raising awareness and supporting survivors of human trafficking. how many cities have this kind of public private cooperation? i don't know but we are among the first and speaks about the efforts put forth in the city but isn't this the city where all things that are impossible can happen? i wanted to just a few people who are here. first and foremost the honorable mayor ed lee. and supervisor carmen chu, has been a great champion. the winners of the sf cat annual poster concert and the keynote speaker, -- a human traffic survivor and advocate. i want to say that other human rights commissioners are here, -- and vice chair doug chen, -- commissioner, the president julie -- nancy kirshner rodriguez, police chief greg sur (sounds like) -- i will like to turn this over to mayor lee.diana are you here? he is on his way. well - thank you. why don't we do that? why waste a moment. >> nancy did mention that we will announce the winners of the fabu
. and that brings us to education nation. which is part of an ongoing commitment by nbc news, to foster a national dialogue about the future of education in america. today education nation is on the road in detroit with he had nbc's education correspondent, rehema ellis. >> we want to talk about what's happening to the schools in michigan. but in detroit, we can't help but talk about what's happening in the city of detroit. joining me right now is the governor of michigan, rick snyder. and the news of the day is that on monday, your emergency financial manager for detroit is going to go to work. there's a lot of controversy around it. people are protesting, saying it's unconstitutional. that he's going to sell off some iconic pieces of the city in order to balance the budget. what do you say? >> well it is legal. this is a crisis. and we need to turn it around. and if you look at, we've had success with emergency managers. if you look at detroit public schools, they've had one for the last several years and we're seeing the kids learn better now. flint and pontiac have emergency managers, working
not be familiar with the 108-plus law in the state of california. and so we do education, from the department of public health in four languages. we sent out in arabic chinese and spanish and english and i will talk about education next. retailers know this law and well informed that it is illegal to sell to minors, virtually know this law that i encounter. the san francisco department of public health provides a mailing every single year for the last seven years to all 1100 retailers, with all of these items in your packet you will see a copy of it in these four different languages. in fact we just sent ours out this year, at the first week of march. so just so you know, all retailers right now have just received the informational packet talking about sales to minors, and in addition when they applied to the state and the board of equalization to the tobacco sort of handling license and they received the education and there is an agency that some of it comes from which is an enforcement agency that does inspections locally as well. there is a lot of opportunities to be educated about this an
deficit. for students in detroit problems with the education system are being magnified by that community's economic troubles. if you look statewide a quarter of michigan children under 17 were living in poverty in 2011. compare that to detroit where the number is more than twice that much. it is 57%, folks. nearly two in three detroit children 5 and under are below the poverty line. msnbc's correspondent joins us live from detroit where she'll cohost a summit on education today and a student town hall tomorrow. those numbers are frightening and daunting. >> they really are startling numbers. i've got my notebook with me because i'm going to school today, chris. it has a lot of people worried and concerned and working to change the dynamics of those numbers. that's what we'll be talking about here. many people are also concerned about the fact, the elephant in the room we can't dismiss that come monday the city of detroit will be under the auspices of an emergency financial manager. people should also know for the past four years detroit schools have been under emergency management and in
on and on with this lock em up mentality and people nod their heads. if people are better educated about these issues they will call the people on the carpet and say wait a minute. i think the mission, if i can give you that, would be to step outside your circle, your work circle and bring this issue to the broader public so they can create a change in the culture and the public's response to these issues that will then enable the politicians and legislators to make the reforms to the finances and the court's etc that really need to happen and one way i think is a good way to do that and i'm talking, i'm a journalist, an advocacy journalist, it's usually said with a sneer but i wear the badge proudly, to reach out to reporter's because of course they do have that soapbox to share these stories with. so reach out to reporter's in your local newspapers, crime reporter's, whoever, and just invite them to spend the day with you. invite them to spend a day looking at just a day in your life as a public defender, a day in the life of you as a parole officer, whatever it is. and it's a tradition journalist
almost four years ago as an educational arm of their work. and we would have dinners and a few classes and we understood there what momentum that people wanted this type of engagement and education in a way that allowed for a more in-depth conversation. we grew and now we offer -- i think we had nine, we have a series where adults learned home cooking and we did a teacher training workshop where san francisco unified public school teachers came and learned to use cooking for the core standards. we range all over the place. we really want everyone to feel like they can be included in the conversation. a lot of organizations i think which say we're going to teach cooking or we're going to teach gardening, or we're going to get in the policy side of the food from conversation. we say all of that is connected and we want to provide a place that feels really community oriented where you can be interested in multiple of those things or one of those things and have an entree point to meet people. we want to build community and we're using food as a means to that end. >> we have a wonderful or
colleagues in the education department in the fine arts museum of san francisco for an allowing me to speak today. valuable artwork -- rene, director of public programs and last on this list but certainly not least gregory stock who is a programming wizard. i'm so grateful for their individual and collective support. i would also like to thank the production manager who is behind-the-scenes somewhere. he's waving. our production manager consistently provide patient and reliable technical support which is beyond value when lecturing to large audiences like those of you gathered today. without further a do, i'm honored to share with you today paintings that comprise the exhibition here at the museum. girl with a pearl earring, from january 26-june 2nd the museum will be the first venue in the american tour of paintings from the royal picture gallery which is located in haik. how many have individual painting in the normal home? a good number of you. this unique museum is often called the jouleewelry box. it has the world's most prestigious paintings from the morris house which toured in 1982
turn to two percent of your monthly income. >> you can enroll in free educational services online. just as it -- visit sfsmartmoney.org. with services like financial education classes and one-on-one meetings with advisers, asset smart money network makes it easy for you to learn all you need to know about managing, saving, investing, and protecting your money. the network offers access to hundreds of financial aid programs. to help their eruptions, fill out the quick questionnaire, and you will be steered to the program you are looking for. >> who want to make sure everyone has the chance to manage their money successfully, keep their money safe, and avoid getting ripped off. >> it sounds very good. i think people should try that one. >> to find out more, visit sfsmartmoney.org or call 211 and ask about the bank on s.f. program. >> now you can have a bank account. open one today. tape 55 >> welcome, this is carl. >> great to meet you. >> great to me you, and i want to thank you for your interest and this is the city's animal shelter. and come in and a lot of people come here to adopt a
will get jobs because of your education but many will pay $200,000 and get little more than that. this is why dale stephens dropped out and has the web site uncollege.org and his book hack education. what do you mean? there is a reason people go to college. >> that is what society says you need to do but that means you have to learn what they tell you the not what you want to interest you. john: i just want comic books and girls i wouldn't have learned anything. >> maybe you start a comic book about girls. [laughter] >> you tell me your doing better? >> there is a community around the world who is actively doing creative things with their education one dropped out now is an artist and getting commissions. summer building solar powered computers but without paying the high cost of college. i did not go to middle school or high school. john: your parents let you leave school? >> they were not fans of the idea but i thought if i leave for one year what is the big loss? if i go back school will be there. john: you even took college courses? you could just not pay? >> professors were
education ends up coming down to money. money is the reason behind the latest and largest school closures in our nations history. chicago is closing 54 schools. can you imagine? it's an effort to shore up the billion dollar budget deficit. as shocking as this sounds, cities are facing similar meesures are in your city could be one of them. could this actually be the best medicine? joining me now is the ceo of the illinois policy institute. >> and the 2010 census, 200,000 africans left and that has been a decades long time. many are declaring that the chicago public school system, which has monopoly control over educational systems is failing. they are leaving. we have these empty schools that have to be closed. melissa: it seems a liitle too easy. some people have been saying that the schools are empty, they are curable schools, is they're not going to be overcrowding? >> chicago's population is in a long-term decline. we have the lowest population that we have had since 1920. it was built from hundreds of thousands of more people. all over the city there is excess capacity. they are movi
a better education than you. and in fact, the reverse is happening. women entering the work force are often better educated, with more academic and trade certifications than men who are doing it. and women are also doing hard and dangerous jobs. we can look to what they do in the military. they can look at how we see them as firefighters and police officers and prison guards. under the legislative i am proposing, no longer will women be on their own and fighting for equal pay or for equal work. in this country, we say work hard and play by the rules, you'll get ahead. we work hard every day but we find that the rules are different for women and for men. actually, the rules in many workplaces are rigged against us. so, mr. president, i would hope that we would pass my amendment today that would allow us to be able to go forward later on in the year and pass paycheck fairness. it is important to the women in the workplace and it's important to our economy. much is being said here about being pro growth. who isn't pro growth? of course we want to grow our economy. and if we look at the tax str
. they are affecting their ability to continue with their employment, education or family responsibilities. so the center on criminal justice would advocate for an increased use or implementation of pretrial services at the local level and some on this panel will speak with more detail on that. >> let me ask miss dewint that you are obviously part of the bail association and the president of the organization, you have decades of experience. critics have argued that your association and other associations like it use their influence by way of lobbying to protect the groups financial interest. i'm wondering if you can respond to that and perhaps give us an idea what kind of lobbying your organization does? >> thank you. first of all let me thank jeff and the san francisco public defenders office for this 10th year of the justice submit summit. thank you and i don't have a prepared speech. i do want to address some of these misconceptions. there is a bail reform and we are part of the reform. we are proud to say that we are part of our regulatory agency with the department of insurance to reest
and the inner track is most abused for all obvious reasons i would like to be educated if there are designs there can be incremental changes because much of the track doesn't seem to be severe but those that are make it impossible to make it a good track. i think it's in terrible shape givens those shots and i appreciate the comments from the public. i have to believe there is something shofert $2 million to make it a first class track and if it isn't i would like to be educated why not. thanks. >> excuse me. we are now are item four which is general public comment up to 15 minutes. at this time members of the public may address the commission on items of interest to the public that are within the subject matter jurisdiction of the commission, and that do not appear on the agenda. with respect to agenda items your opportunity to address the commission will be afforded when the item is reached in the meeting. please as a note remember this is for 15 minutes only and as i said earlier we had general public comment continued on item 10 so if your name isn't called this time it will be ca
on education and awareness but it's not enough. we need direct services. we need to raise our voices and bush congress and let them know that the united states must recommit to putting resources to ending trafficking. and comprehensive immigration reform. and statewide. we should continue to fight for legislation like the domestic worker to live rights of other things that promote marginalization of our clients. at the end of the day and work with survivors we need to understand and listen and let them know that the work goes on. i want to thank -- a personal mentor. she has really been a mentor; she challenges us and says we are not powerless. what about ...? that is the question we should always ask ourselves. thank you. (applause) >> thank you again to mayor ed lee who has to leave and catch a plane. thank you. (applause) now i would like to call on supervisor carmen chu who has been fantastic and is been really outspoken; she has spoken so often and so well. it is a pleasure to have you here. >> supervisor chu: i want to thank nancy, and the department, and the commission. i want
. they have an effort to balance their budget and they are cutting aid to higher education. sometimes up to 75% cuts in one year. 75% of students attend public universities. that is where this is happening. what the government is attempting to do is slightly decreased the amount of money they are making off of these students, going from 16% to 11% in fees. they do want to ensure that students are paying back something every month. so that we are preventing the cycle of default which benefits everybody in this process. allowing students were not able to get a job. really predatory loans, interest rates that are higher, refinancing to pay off over time. >> i think one of the biggest problem is that we need to increase the qualifications for loans. we need to make it more academics we see students getting into the university system. not everyone benefits from a college education. neil: high school seniors, for example, breaking out. >> is if they are able to thrive in a college environment and their background. we have to make sure that we're putting those students through college. we don't want
to see better educated, but you understand that an effective member has to negotiate and has to compromise to come to some sort of final product. otherwise you will never get a final product. >> i agree with -- what is the biggest problem we face today that we are just stop gone? it is this fiscal crisis, the budget. families are looking at it and saying i have got to deal with this all the time, and you guys cannot deal with it. the biggest thing to me would be the leadership of congress to recognize that the budget aocess has to be utilized in way that gets this issue resolved, because if we go every three months with more in decision and 11th-hour -- making, thetizen frustration that people have to live their lives and cannot figure out the process, it will drive them nuts and treat the most negative phillies in the world. it is the responsibility of leadership to make this process work, and they have to act like leaders, like tom daschle did and some of the other folks. >> changing the rules might take the incentive structure, but ultimately is about the men and women who
: a big part is education; right? education of using the card in an appropriate fashion. why is that also a key -- a key promise of what you are doing? >> well, we're at an innovation conference, so many innovations and payments in the marketplace. what's challenging is getting consumers to understand the features and benefits getting them to adopt them. that's what pay perks is here for, educate consumers about what products and features are available for them and get them to use them in ways that benefit, again, the value chain. shibani: dozens of companies here, but few run by a female. talk to me about being a woman in this environment, in this lean in time that cheryl sandberg talked about, and, you know, just overall what your views are. >> it's not something i think about a lot. with sheryl out now, it is interesting to think about. i think that there's no difference between male and female ceos, and i think it's nice to get attention from a female ceo, but i would rather be recognized as a ceo. shibani: it was on this day in business back in 1894 that the very first stanley cup ch
and making sure that our youth get quality education and training them to be able to compete for the jobs of the 21st century economy. the fact is and i have said this often, you can't give a job to a dead youth. you can't tell that youth not to lose hope. and that they can succeed no matter where you come from for too long. we have seen too much violence in our communities and it must end. yesterday i signed into law the nation's first ban on possession of halopoint ammunition in san francisco. we worked closely with supervisor cohen to introduce this legislation. these extra deadly bullets have no place in our streets. we are also creating an early warning system to alert us when individuals make massive purchases of ammunition, because even if there is a remote possibility we can prevent another tragedy, we are morally bound to do so. and we must support president obama and senator finestien comprehensive effort to reform the gun laws, i support state and federal effort to keep the weapons off of our streets and out of our homes. i have directed our city agencies and law enforcement of
. it would be an enormous gift to mcconnell. >> sean: a gift. >> really, okay, let me educate you about a recent poll. because clearly you don't-- >> tamara is it possible for he you to educate me? >> i know, you know it all. opponents two-one. he's like a crypt keeper, he won't go away. >> sean: like the former klansman who used to head up your party from west virginia. >> you, two, mcconnell isn't doing anything. nobody likes him. whether you like ashley judd, or not. -- >> tamara, tamara, i will bet any amount of money if ashley judd runs against mitch mcconnell in kentucky, she will not be a senator from the state of kentucky-- tennessee, i'm sorry. >> and left leaning, a left leaning pollster currently has mcconnell leading all. and a left-leaning pollster. >> because she's incredibly polarizing. some of the things she said, it was unconscionable to breed. >> sean: unconscionable to breed. >> because there are so many starving children. and has a problem with a father giving away a daughter at the wedding. >> sean: keep going. >> a problem with christianity because it legitimizes m
the victim blame that aren't educated when they go into their jury box. so they still lean -- especially women, they still lean towards the male perpetrators of the violence. so although these tweets certainly help, we also have to educate the people in the jury box. we also have to educate the parents. and especially the academic institutions that hired these coaches, that allowed these coaches to stay, that allowed this whole culture to permeate. >> dr. drew, we have two elements to this. we have many elements, but two specific elements. what happened before the actual incident and during the incident itself, the crime. and then what happened after. everything that everyone posted online, all the blaming of the victim, all the sharing of the videos. and i want to ask you this. >> yeah. >> we as grown-ups seem to have problems stopping and filtering our meanness between our fingers and our tweets. we are doing a terrible job at that. you can just log onto my twitter account and see what people say about me and what kind of words they've used. they've never met me. >> it's brutal, right?
actually provide group medical visits and group education classes and meeting people who have similar chronic illnesses as you do really helps you understand that you are not alone in dealing with this. and it validates the experiences that you have and so you learn from each other. >> i think it's very important to try to be in tune with the needs of the community and a lot of our patients have -- a lot of our patients are actually immigrants who have a lot of competing priorities, family issues, child care issues, maybe not being able to find work or finding work and not being insured and health care sometimes isn't the top priority for them. we need to understand that so that we can help them take care of themselves physically and emotionally to deal with all these other things. they also have to be working through with people living longer and living with more chronic conditions i think we're going to see more patients coming through. >> starting next year, every day 10,000 people will hit the age of 60 until 2020. . >> the needs of the patients that we see at kerr senior center o
's educational about this facility. >> fire fly by artist ned con is an art installation which rises straight from the golden gate avenue sidewalk to the top of the building. >> the fire fly wall will be 5 by 5 polley carbon plates that will move with the wind and show a wave effect in the daytime. when those also swing back and forth and they hit the fulcrum, it will also set up an led light that will cover the fire fly. so, at nighttime people in another part of san francisco can see the side of our building and about 20 feet wide and 10 stories high will be a wall that will flickr on and off like fire flies at nighttime. it will be so energy efficient that if all those lights go on, it will be the equivalent of a 40 watt bulb. and also the new piece of artwork going all the way down the side of the building, which looks like this incredible wind ripples on a pond. and i thought, oh, my god, how incredible, how wonderful. >> inside the building we will have water walls in the main staircase, and the water will be dripping through the side of the wall. you'll be able to hear it, you'll be ab
education, we need to make sure we protect medicare and what we've seen and the alternative is they don't do that. that create as voucher program for medicare. >> we certainly agree on the opposition to a recession. senator corker, you going to vote for this budget? >> no, i'm not. i don't expect you think i would. it really doesn't address any of the major issues that we need to be dealing with. there's no entitlement reform. republicans would like to see a 75 year fix for our entitlements so that we'll see, know those will be here down the road. if you want to know the truth, larry, neither budget does the things that need to be done for our country but i will say two nights ago we passed a cr, first time since i've been in the united states senate in six years and to months. i was able to vote for a bill that cut real spending. we'll go through this budget process and the democratic budget obviously as you just mentioned doesn't do what it needs to do. republican budget could do more, maybe there's a remote chance that we have a conference that actually addresses the big issues of the da
stronger. that's what the house republican budget does. it cuts investments in education so our students and workers are less prepared for the jobs of the future. it would undermine our ability to upgrade our roads and bridges and highways and ports, even though our national infrastructure just got a d-plus from the american society of civil engineers. and the house budget would greatly reduce our ability to support research and development, making it so much harder for us to maintain the innovative edge that helps us attract new industries and new businesses to the united states. mr. president, americans want to see a budget that puts the middle class first and asks the wealthiest americans and biggest corporations to do their fair share too as we work towards deficit reduction. so our senate budget locks in tax cuts for the middle class while closing loopholes and cutting wasteful spending in the tax code. and our budget uses that new revenue from the wealthiest americans and big corporations for deficit reduction and for investments that support our economy and strengthen our middle c
service educated them about return policies, there is a bit of sidewalk research in the marina. after all, he heard the recall of black pants will reduce full earns by 27 cents a share. >> i pay attention to the bend over test, yes. >> i haven't seen any of these sheer pants. >> reporter: chad sheaf reminded us yogis are a calm bunch. >> come into yoga, some people wear less than that. they have holes in the wrong places sometimes. >> reporter: how is that for transparency. no mistake. >> now if you have a transparent pair you can get store credit or a full refund. you don't have to bend over to prove your point. these are -- >> we'll check it out. >> these are not see-through. >> they're famous pants and the company ceo announced today new quality control measures and changes to their sourcing methods. >> thank goodness for that. >> we can breathe a sigh of relief. >> that is a huge story. a lot of people have e-mailed us thinking they had to bend over to, you know, verify the fact that you could see something there and it's been, you know, a source of consternation for a lot of folks. >
~ the next leadership. so, the next supervisor, the next member of the board of education, so on and so forth. so, it's important that we are putting into this pipeline and training a really diverse population. so, we have the ability, we've got 8 applicants and there's actually 3 seats. so, i can tell you that i had an opportunity to sit down -- to meet with minnie ingersoll and met with kia, and then i believe jonathan alloy also reached out to our office. and also for the people in the future, it's really helpful when you reach out to us because it gives us an opportunity to have one on one time and to develop a more of a feel and sense of direction of who you are and what direction you'd like to bring the committee that you're going to be working on, direction that you're going to bring this committee in. so, i just put forward three names of folks that i was most impressed with. maybe that might help you. >> what are they? >> again, not a problem. ms. ingersoll, [speaker not understood] and ms. alloy. >> thank you for your thoughts. so, here's my thoughts. again, a tough decision here. b
'm going home and there is people all the time up in there educating myself about the law, i know is fast to get in there, but when the wheels are turned to come home, it's slow. i couldn't accept it. people are like they are going to do this to time. i said no, this is clear. this was what was supposed to have been done from the beginning. even my families, my loved wupz ones that lost. that made me fight more. i never gate gave up my fate. my hope is restored. >> with that i would like to thank all of our panelist. thank you. [ applause ] and we are now going to move to our second panel. while they take their seats, this idea of forced treatment versus constitutional rights has always been a tension that we've had in our criminal justice system. there is an issue that came up earlier this year that you may have read about involving this implementation of a court that was supposed to treat individuals who were suffering from long-term alcoholism. and the court was set up in a way where individuals were not being arrested for a crime but instead were being jailed for contempt of court a
you commissioners. i'm dennis mckenzie. i'm working on educational proposals for 25 years and teaching public high school for the last 12 years. i provide you with a copy of my update for my request for the request for warriors. as you know from the previous material i have provided to the warriors and all the officials in san francisco for the last year by now i'm hopeful that this initial proposal could be implemented so that eventually another component that you receive deals with the developing cross cultural exchange programs for a number of countries but for sure the americas can begin with mexico and central america where i have been communicating with different elders and council in general and guatemala of providing a small classroom to bring students and schools and different officials people around this country to meet our students in this arena and learn how to facility can operate for the benefit of all our kids and students and also different states across the country and using that as a model for the cross cultural program as well. i wish everyone well and i believe that
foundations. dedicated to strengthening america's future through education. adcasting, dedicated to strengthening america's future and contributions to your pbs station, from viewers like you. in the neighborhood ♪ and contributions to your pbs station, ♪ a beautiful day for a neighbor ♪ ♪ would you be mine? ♪ could you be mine? ♪ won't you be my neighbor? - ♪ it's daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ ♪ a land of make-believe ♪ won't you ride along with me? ♪ - ♪ ride along - ♪ it's daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ ♪ so much to do, so much to see ♪ ♪ won't you ride along with me? ♪ - ♪ ride along - ♪ i've got lots of friends for you to meet ♪ ♪ in this land of make-believe ♪ a friendly face on every street ♪ ♪ just waiting to greet you ♪ it's a beautiful day in the neighborhood ♪ ♪ a beautiful day for a neighbor ♪ ♪ in daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ (laughing) - hi, neighbor! we are in the vegetable garden at school. - hello, neighbor. come on, daniel, let's go pick some veggies! - vegetables! have you ever picked vegetables? i h
of education's ready to learn grant, and viewers like you, thank you. looks like we bothave a lot of catching up to do. well, visit pbskidsgo.org, where you can play a lot of games for your favorite characters, and win votes, too. well, go ahead, what are you waiting for? guys, i've been training -- i'm sorry. this is totally a blooper. (laughing) marcus... (laughter) >>> this is "nightly business report." >> moving higher. stocks finish on an up note. still on track for the best quarter in 15 years. >>> water, water not everywhere. how the on going drought is hitting texas especially hard and how it may get worse. >>> and too late or not? why there is still time to refinance your mortgage but you may not want toait much longer. all that and more coming up right now. welcome to our viewing. >> investors were back in the buying mood as stocks bounced back but still closed lower for the week. the dow snapped the streak of four straight winning weeks and the s&p 500 logging the second losing week in 2013. the markets got a lift on optimism out of cyprus combined with a batch o stronger tha expec
level so that all children could have a nice education or access to a better education. >> so now what does the state think about all this? well, state board members express strong support and authorize the superintendent and president of schools to draft a formal comment on the waiver. now here is the rub. if the nine districts get approval for their plan, you can look for lots of other districts to line up right behind them. >>> and the u.s. is about to cast a much wider cyber security net with a new plan that will affect many of the country's private sector employees. the white house has signed an executive order expanding a cyber security program that scans internet traffic heading into and out of defense contractors. workers at big banks, utilities and key transportation companies will have their e-mailings and web surfing scanned as a precaution against cyber attackinattac attacks. >>> and compromise and peace, that was the message president obama delivered today on the second day of his middle east trip. more from our world tonight. >>> raj, president obama urged both the israel
the young people here want. they want the ability to make their own decisions and get an education and get a good job and worship god in their own way, to get married, raise family. the same is true of those young palestinians i met with this morning. the same is true for young palestinians who yearn for a better life in gaza. that's where peace begin, not just in the plans of leaders but in the hearts of people. >> this was mr. obama's chance to appeal to a new generation of israelis and to reach out to them in a personal way, something his critics charge he hasn't done before. in many ways it was vintage obama. the world witnessed the return of the hope and change go from 00:2from -- change guy from 2008. >> let me say this as a politician. i can promise you this. political leaders will never take risks if the people do not push them to take some risks. you must create the change that you want to see. ordinary people can accomplish compare things. >> get your cell phones out. i want to know what you think. tonight's question. will the middle east take president obama's message of compro
is not just to entertain you, but i'm trying to teach and educate you so call me, 1-800-743-cnbc. look, maybe it just needs to go lower. that's what i thought all day as the market see-sawed. the dow closing down 90 points, s&p back sliding .83%. nasdaq falling 0.97%. to me the stock market is represented by the broad averages. the sum of the evidence that's out there right now about where things are headed in the future. in the last 24 hours, the weight of the evidence has shifted to the negative. unless we get some big breaks here, these negatives will begin to be reflected in the averages beyond where they went out today. you know i've said repeatedly i'm willing to take a pass of the last percent or two of the rally because i don't want to be greedy. bulls make money, bears make money and hogs are slaughtered. i thought it would take out the high by now, inspiring too much short-term euphoria. that hasn't happened, which in itself i find worrisome. i didn't that like so many of the loudest bears out there like adam parker, nice guy, morgan stanley, have just turned bullish. it did bother
stance this is an important educational event. the decision maybe made. it's out of our hands now. we have to move forward. >> bill: all right. so your your educational sex week stuff about how to protect yourself, about responsibility. about, maybe, what the right and wrong of it is, as far as we're americans and this is how we should treat each other, i think that's fine. but, the how-two stuff. i think i would have charged admission for that a couple of bucks and not had any private money going to that. any public money going to that. just do that privately on the side. so, if people want to see that kind of stuff, they pay for it. would that have been unreasonable? >> yes. that would have been unreasonable. i disagree because we submitted a survey that many over 500 of our students filled out. and we provided programming based on their survey. and we're providing student fees. >> >> bill: you are telling me that the taxpayers of american should be beholden to college kids to pay for what they want. if that were the case, at marist college, the tax
much done when they were leaving the committee on health, education, labor and pensions. the 80/20 will means that we agree on 80% of the stuff and we disagreed on 20% of issued we decided to focus on 80% we agreed on, set the other aside to look at another day. that's how they were able to get a lot done. maybe describes what we're doing here. whatever you're doing i think is working, just keep at it. said in a at this next. she stepped out for a moment. we would go to senator heitkamp. if senator -- senator heitkamp, you are recognized. >> thank you so much mr. chairman. and thank you for appearing today. i actually do know janet pretty well, and she's not perfect. tell her i said that. [laughter] we were '80s together. during my time in public life, i've been a tax auditor, tax commission. i've been and attorney general. so this is an area that a think i've kind of two perspectives on but how difficult it is to do security, how difficult it is to wake up every day and realize primarily your mission is to protect this country and to protect people. but the only we can do it is
. joining me now is karen lewis. with a welcome, i know your biggest concern, aside from a good education for these kids are your teachers of which a thousand could lose their jobs. let's talk about the timing of this. you have chicago mayor rahm emanuel. he did issue the statement over the past decade. this decision was delayed while we put more money into keeping buildings open rather than investing it where it should be, in our children's education. now we'll be able to better use funds for our children's future. >> i think it's a lovely talking point. and this is what this mayor does. he uses rhetoric that sounds reasonable. but if you unpack it, you find out that first of all, in this so-called billion dollar deficit, which of course is the press release deficit, it always changes later on. the actual amount of money this will cost, especially, if it's done correctly, which god forbid they've never done anything correctly before in terms of school closings. this will cost almost a billion dollars itself. so i don't believe any of this. rahm emanuel doesn't know the truth if it would
any educator would try to justify any terrorist attacks against the united states that killed 3,000 innocent americans. it's not just this one question. she also says that the test had some other issues as well that talked about whether food and medicine and shelter were rights or responsibilities. her son got that one wrong as well saying it was a responsibility. that it's not the government that should be in your lives making sure there is shelter over your head, making sure you have food on the table, medicine to keep you well and health care essentially. she says this is the american dream that i believe in. that's what i've been trying to teach my kids and this test is going against it. >>brian: it was on facebook and now has become a huge story. an update on that fox news alert. a shooting in quantico, virginia, where a suspected shooter killed two marines and then killed himself. sherry ly joins us live with the details. when did this happen? >> this happened at 11:00 last night at the officer candidate school. we're told that the gunman and the two victims were all activ
of various scenarios, how things can be handled. a few, what is happening? caller: i am in education, and we have civilians students and military in the same classes. of theworking options next go around of not having civilians in the classroom because they cannot be in there for five days a week. we are looking at all the different options, have to spend a lot of tried -- time. host: let's hear from another federal worker, a democrat in virginia. good morning, michael. say godi would like to bless america and c-span, and thank you for being here. i would like to say, the sequestration is going to have a big affect up and down the east coast, from here to texas, that firstpan into the early and second quarter of next year. work, psychologically, i see people slowing down. you know, inlike, a grip, waiting for some thing to happen. i have friends and other agencies, and other parts of virginia and places. i just see the intensity. cut ofu throw in the almost $10,000 for me, for 22 days, you add the payroll tax, i am looking at a setback of -- or a contraction of 13,000 dollars or $14,000 this
-around you that could potentially be toxic to your body. education is key. if you have any concerns, as always, discuss them with your physician, those are my doctor's orders, thanks for joining us! [ crowd cheering ] [ applause ] ♪ >> (male announcer): live from the bay area this is the kron 4 morning news. kron 4 news at 4 starts now. >> good morning. it is friday march 22nd. we are taking a live look at the golden gate bridge. some days in it. not bad. >> let us find out about whether and traffic. us start with the weather. good morning erica. >> good morning james happy friday. we're starting off with clear conditions around the bay area. though winds howling over night. gusty winds from the coast the water. strongest from the north bay mountains. right now we are dealing with tippers in the '40's. not to bad of a start as we head into the afternoon. we will see plenty of sunshine. we could see low seventies for a handful of locations. >> letter to my id will be clear and mild temperatures back down to the '50s and '60s. >> looking at conditions. 40 degrees and napa. vallejo 3
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